Thursday, April 30, 2009

Another thing...

... I have only seen in Spain so far:


The "Ferraiolone-Wrap"!


I don't know the deeper meaning or rationale behind this. Maybe one of the trusted readers has some information?


The bishop in the photos is Pablo Barrachina Estevan. He was bishop of Orihuela-Alicante from 1954 to 1989 and only died last year at the age of 96.


This last photo doesn't show the wrap, but I thought it would be nice to see the good old ferraiolone in its splendor, too

10 comments:

SJH said...

I've seen (Spanish) Opus Dei priests do this with their cassocks in New York City, bringing them up under their overcoats. I think it's just a way to keep them from getting messy in the streets.

Anonymous said...

Siento no poder expresarme en inglés. No se trata de un envoltorio puesto sobre el ferraiolo. Es la forma tipicamente española de ponerse-recogerse el manteo para moverse con mayor comodidad. Se cruza por delante levantandolo y se sujeta con los brazos (bajo de ellos) En ocasiones se lleva un hombro destapado o incluso los dos.

leo said...

WHAT?

Maybe a reader who knows Spanish can help with the translation? Tanks!

Pavegs said...

Just a guess but it seems to me that there is probably no significance to this at all. He is getting out of a car and probably didn't want his ferraiolo to get all wrinkled by sitting on it so he wrapped it up and put it on his lap. Usually the simplest explanation is the best one.

John said...

OK, I asked and I got this:

You must understand that all members of the secular clergy in Spain used to wear the "manteo" practically all the time when outside the house, until the early 1960s. The custom was to fold it, which was called "terciar el manteo" and the manner you describe is just one of the many versions of doing it.

John said...

Neat car, btw...

leo said...

Alright, thanks guys!

Yeas, my first guess was prevention from utter wrinkage, too.

And, yes: Neat car, indeed!

latinmass1983 said...

The guy who wrote in Spanish says that it was the typical way of wearing the ferraiuolone so as to move more easily. There's no particular meaning to this.

Anonymous said...

How do the Opus Dei priests fold their cassock like this, without showing bare legs or undergarments?

SJH said...

In the United States at least, priests typically wear normal wool dress pants or dark chino pants under their cassocks.