Monday, March 16, 2009

Found in the LIFE-collection



These two photos show Cardinal Wyszyński with a canon who wears a somewhat distinctive cappa. It looks like the train is held together by red bows towards the end and then carried across the arm in some kind of loop. The color reminds me of the cappa of the canons from Krakow but their train doesn't have those strange red bows (or does it and I just failed to recognize it?), so I am kind of puzzled here.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

this priest this is pastor Machay- archipresbiter from BMV in marktpleace in Kraków.

Anonymous said...

The new Caeremoniale Episcoporum (promulgated in 1984) reserves the Cappa magna to the Bishop. The "ancien regime" (the Caeremoniale Episcoporum in force until 1984) allowed the Cappa for Canons and Bishops alike, but only the Bishop could display the whole thing (several metres worth of silk or cloth, which had to be carried by an assistant). The lower ranks had to bind up the Cappa magna and carry the cloth themselves, as shown in the photo, without an assistant. This old custom has been outlawed in the meantime, but in some places it has survived. If you want to know more about this, read up in John Abel Nainfa (available via www.archive.org ).

Hermann

John said...

In Ireland and Britain we call it cappa parva. Even today the canons at Westminster use it. The French call the funy tale "tortillon".

Anonymous said...

I think this is what Nainfa calls the "Curtailed Cappa"